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Decision Points

  • Injuries account for a considerable percentage of health-related expenses. Safeguarding employees from automobiles crashes makes good sense for businesses; traffic crashes cost companies and employers billions of dollars in direct crash-related costs, such as medical care liability, lost productivity and property damage. Cost-conscious companies and employers would be smart to control costs by providing comprehensive driver safety programs, promoting safe driving practices through sound driver policy and enforcement, educating employees to the dangers of distracted driving, whether or not employees are on the clock. Safeguarding employees from motor vehicle crash injury can be a profitable investment of time and resources. Employers cost associated with motor vehicle crashes fall under two categories - health fringe benefit costs and non fringe benefits

  • In 2013, motor vehicle crashes killed more than 1,600 people and injured 293,000 while they were working. Over half of the injuries forced people to miss work. Overall, on-the-job crash injuries (fatal and non-fatal) amounted to about 7.6% of all crash injuries. Motor vehicle crashes on and off the job cost employers $47.4 billion in 2013. Nearly half of this cost resulted from off-the-job injuries to workers and their dependents. The remainder resulted from on-the-job crashes. The report also found that employer-paid medical costs per employee injured in a crash were nearly double in on-the-job crashes where the employee wasn't wearing a seat belt and were increased by a third for off-the-job crashes. "When people think of the human and

  • The National Safety Council (NSC) recently released a report outlining the finding of their latest study. From January to June of this year, the total number of motor-vehicle deaths was at 18,630, a 14% increase from the last 6 months of 2014. The NSC believes there are a number of factors behind these statistics. Firstly, the NSC says that the increase in fatalities might have something to do with lower gas prices. Gas prices have averaged 30% less than last year, a number that has contributed to more vehicles being on the road. The NSC goes on to say that gas prices and the economy are interconnected, and they aren't able to determine if an improving economy might have something

  • At its latest meeting, the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) elected Jana Simpler as Chair. She has been the Director of the Delaware Office of Highway Safety since 2010, and she has served for both the Association's Executive Board and the Federal Relations Committee. In response to an increase of almost 10 percent in roadway deaths during the first quarter of 2015, Simpler plans to focus on driver behavior in traffic crashes and fatalities. She plans to explore alternatives in automated enforcement technology to reduce speeding and prevent red light running. Altogether, Simpler believes that a collaborative approach will yield best results. By enacting and enforcing stricter laws, public education, and partnerships between the private and public sectors, Simpler hopes

  • Florida has implemented CTSTs, or Community Traffic Safety Teams, to help solve traffic safety issues. These teams are comprised of highway safety advocates, and these groups work to solve local traffic concerns that include drivers, roads, and automobiles. Ultimately, CTSTs want to reduce the number of auto accidents and decrease the severity of these crashes. These teams are in place across the state of Florida, and they all belong to the CTST Coalition. Each quarter, this organization meets to share knowledge, statistics, and successes. All of the CTSTs are part of the Community Traffic State Program, which was created after federal legislation recommended a more localized response to finding solutions for auto accidents and the accidents and deaths that occur

  • Despite safer vehicles and tighter laws, American roads are still dangerous. In 2014, 32,675 people were killed in traffic accidents, and the year before, 2.3 million people were injured in vehicular accidents. Why are these numbers still so astonishingly large? If American roads were as safe as those in Ireland, the number of deaths prevented each year would be nearly the same as stopping all murders in the country. Traffic accident-related deaths and injuries are as bad as ever due to a number of factors. For instance, the rate of motorcyclists dying on the roadways has more than doubled since the 90s. There are more roads, yes, but 31 states don’t require adult bikers to wear helmets. Speed limits are

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