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  • Gridlocked What an odd, and great, Superbowl game. But enough distractions... let's get back to America's true favorite national pass-time - sitting in traffic! Ok, may not really be your favorite, but according to a recent study, you do a heck of a lot of it... in fact they've estimated we spend roughly five and a half billion extra hours per year sitting in traffic. That equals roughly $121 billion dollars a year in "wasted time" and fuel. The Texas A&M Transportation Institute released a report Tuesday that found Americans are adapting to road congestion by allowing, on average, an hour to make a trip that would take 20 minutes without traffic. The Urban Mobility Report also says clogged roads

    Feb 06,
    - by Michael
  • Nodded off The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety recently released a study (pdf) where 46% of 3,303 drivers responding to the survey self-assess that they have nodded off while driving at some point in their lives, with nearly 10% admitting to nodding off behind the wheel at least once in the last 12 months. Drowsy driving is a factor in a substantial number of accidents each year. Earlier studies... ...estimated that 15% - 33% of drivers involved in fatal crashes nationwide from 2001 through 2003 were drowsy (Masten, Stutts, & Martell, 2006). A study using cameras to monitor the driving of 109 drivers for 12-13 months each estimated that 22% of crashes and near crashes involved drowsiness (Klauer, Dingus, Neale,

    Jan 08,
    - by Michael
  • The GAO recently released a report Selected Cases of Commercial Drivers with Potentially Disqualifying Impairments that explores weaknesses in FMCSA and DOT controls designed to prevent drivers with certain medical conditions from renewing their CDLs. Matching CDL holders with Social Security Administration (SSA) disability files produced 204 commercial drivers who drove a commercial vehicle as recently as 2011 despite having epilepsy, a disqualifying medical condition characterized by sudden seizures and unconsciousness. Thirty-one of these drivers were involved in accidents, demonstrating the threat to public safety posed by medically impaired drivers. GAO also identified 23 cases where state licensing agencies issued or renewed CDLs for drivers after they were, according to SSA records, diagnosed with epilepsy or had drug or alcohol

    Dec 18,
    - by Michael
  • (Please Note: This post was originally published with a few errors. Mr. Payette was kind enough to correct my mistakes with an email. This version contains those corrections and some additional detail that he added.) I was on my way home from the NSC Congress in Orlando, driving up I-4 when I passed another Staples truck driving in the slow lane at a cool 60 miles per hour. I've been involved in eco-driving practice and research since 2006, so I had long kept an eye on the Staples trucks, with the "My Max Speed is 60″ sign on the back. I had always admired the company for making such a simple fuel saving change in such a conspicuous way. As

    Dec 18,
    - by Michael
  • Last week there was a minor buzz about a story suggesting a relationship between politics and traffic deaths. The article identifies the 10 states with the highest number of traffic fatalities per 100,000 residents supported Romney in the last election, and the states with the fewest number of traffic accidents per 100,000 residents supported Obama. To an extent that mystifies safety experts and other observers, federal statistics show that people in red states are more likely to die in road crashes. The least deadly states - those with the fewest crash deaths per 100,000 people -- overwhelmingly are blue. Take a look at the federal statistics and cross-reference a map of the recent election, and you'll find that the correlation

    Nov 24,
    - by Michael

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