CSA Driver Training Course

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) training course for Commercial and Medium Duty Vocational Truck Drivers and Management.


Based on the FMCSA's Behavior Analysis & Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs), the program aims to reduce the risk of drivers committing violations under CSA regulations, and it allows carriers to train all drivers or dispense violation-based training.


Seven training modules make up the CSA Driver Training Program. These modules are separate from the current defensive driver training courses and will not be triggered by the Hazard Perception Evaluation. The new CSA Driver Training Course consists of the following lessons:


  • Crash Indicator: Targets drivers with histories or patterns of high crash involvement.
  • Cargo-Related Violations: Targets drivers who fail to prevent commercial vehicle cargo from shifting, spilling or dropping, and drivers who handle hazardous materials unsafely.
  • Controlled Substances and Alcohol: Targets for drivers operating commercial vehicles while impaired by alcohol or drugs.
  • Driver Fitness: Targets drivers operating commercial vehicles without the appropriate training, experience or medical qualifications.
  • Fatigued Driving: Targets drivers operating commercial vehicles while ill, fatigued or in violation of Hours-of-Service regulations.
  • Unsafe Driving: Targets drivers operating commercial vehicles in dangerous or careless ways.
  • Vehicle Maintenance: Targets drivers who fail to properly maintain commercial vehicles.

The comprehensive CSA training program is available in English only for Commercial Trucks and Medium Duty Vocational Trucks.


To better understand how the program differs between the 2 vehicle types, see the table below.

Vehicle Type Video Graphics (Slides/Stats)
Commercial Trucks Video features only 18-wheel vehicles. Where applicable, graphics feature 18-wheel vehicles. Where applicable, graphics feature 18-wheel vehicles.
Medium Vocational
Trucks
Video features a mix of 18-wheel vehicles and cube vans. Where applicable, graphics feature cube vans. Where applicable, graphics feature cube vans.

Additional information about the CSA and BASICs can be found here: http://csa.fmcsa.dot.gov


FMCSA Study Says Web Based Training is Effective

Safety Manager at BrightFleet.com A recent Federal Motor Safety Administration (FMCSA) study finds that well-designed web-based instruction (WBI) is an effective means of training a widely distributed work-force, concluding "evidence also suggests that technology-based instruction, including WBI, is less costly and potentially more effective than traditional instructional methods when developed by staff experienced in the design of online training".


These training materials are created by a group of highly specialized instructional designers, who focus specifically on adult learning theory and how to effectively use web-based software to deliver comprehensive driver training programs that meet the most demanding fleet training requirements.


This web-based training is affordable, easily scalable, ready to implement, and provides your organization's management and drivers with the information they need to ensure compliance with the new CSA requirements.


Fleet CSA Driver Training Course Modules

Based on Behavior Analysis and Safety Improvement Categories (BASICs), the program aims to reduce the risk of drivers committing violations under CSA regulations, and it allows carriers to train all drivers or dispense violation-based training.

Unsafe Driving

Targets drivers operating commercial vehicles in dangerous or careless ways.The Unsafe Driving BASIC specifically addresses the requirements within the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) Parts 392 and 397 and refers to the operation of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) by drivers in a dangerous or careless manner. Some example roadside safety violations that may cause a motor carrier to rank poorly in this BASIC include speeding, reckless driving, improper lane change, and inattention.

Fatigued Driving

Targets drivers operating commercial vehicles while ill, fatigued or in violation of Hours-of-Service regulations. Specifically, the Fatigued Driving (HOS) BASIC addresses the requirements within the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) 49 CFR Parts 392 and 395 to obey HOS rules and not drive when drowsy. This BASIC includes violations of the regulations pertaining to records of duty status (RODS) as they relate to HOS requirements and the management of commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driver fatigue. Some example roadside safety violations that may cause a motor carrier to rank poorly in this BASIC include a driver operating more hours than allowed under HOS regulations and falsification of RODS.

Driver Fitness

Targets drivers operating commercial vehicles without the appropriate training, experience or medical qualifications. The Driver Fitness BASIC specifically addresses the requirements within the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) Parts 383 and 391 and refers to the operation of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) by drivers who are unfit to operate a CMV due to a lack of training, experience, or medical qualifications. Some example roadside safety violations of the regulations that may cause a motor carrier to rank poorly in this BASIC include failure to have a valid and appropriate commercial driver's license (CDL) and being medically unqualified to operate a CMV.

Vehicle Maintenance

Targets drivers who fail to properly maintain commercial vehicles. The Vehicle Maintenance BASIC specifically addresses the requirements within the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) Parts 393 and 396 to properly maintain a commercial motor vehicle (CMV). Proper maintenance includes, for example, ensuring that lamps or reflectors are working and tires are not worn. Some example roadside safety violations that may cause a motor carrier to rank poorly in this BASIC include operating an out-of-service vehicle or a vehicle with inoperative brakes, lights, and/or other mechanical defects, and failure to make required repairs.

Controlled Substances and Alcohol

Targets for drivers operating commercial vehicles while impaired by alcohol or drugs. The Controlled Substances/Alcohol BASIC specifically addresses the requirements in Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) Parts 382 and 392. The Controlled Substances/Alcohol BASIC deals with the operation of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) by drivers who are impaired due to alcohol, illegal drugs, and the misuse of prescription or over-the-counter medications. Some example roadside violations that may cause a motor carrier to rank poorly in this BASIC include a driver(s) failing an alcohol test, which indicates an alcohol level of .02 or greater, and operating under the influence of illegal drugs.

Crash Indicator

Targets drivers with histories or patterns of high crash involvement. The CSA program defines the Crash Indicator BASIC as histories or patterns of high crash involvement, such as frequency and severity. It is based on information from State-reported crashes that meet reportable crash standards. The Crash Indicator BASIC uses crash history that is not specifically a behavior but instead the consequence of a behavior or set of behaviors. The consequence of a behavior(s) can point to a problem that needs attention. State-reported crashes raise the percentile rank of the Crash Indicator, which indicates lower safety compliance.

Cargo-Related Violations

Targets drivers who fail to prevent commercial vehicle cargo from shifting, spilling or dropping, and drivers who handle hazardous materials unsafely. The Cargo-Related BASIC specifically addresses the requirements within the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) Parts 392, 393, 397, and Hazardous Materials (HM) Regulations to properly prevent shifting loads, spilled or dropped cargo, overloading, and unsafe handling of HM on a commercial motor vehicle (CMV). Some example roadside safety violations that may cause a motor carrier to rank poorly in this BASIC include improper load securement (see the specific securement requirements by commodity type in 49 CFR Part 393.116-393.136), cargo retention, and HM handling.
 
 

Instructional Designers


This training content was created with the help of a specific group of professionals called Instructional Designers. These professionals specialize in adult learning theory and how to maximize the efficiency of training content.


What they told us is that not all adults learn the same. The three leading adult learning styles include: those who learn best through reading comprehension, those who relate to information strongly through statistical figures, numbers and graphs, and lastly individuals who learn best through a combination of audio and video.


This training has adopted these learning styles and incorporated them into all of these training programs. The end result is comprehensive training programs that are very engaging and memorable.

High Retention Training Schedule


Clients commonly run their training programs annually. This includes the Hazard Perception Evaluation used once a year, in combination with baseline training modules assigned with different due dates weeks apart to reduce overload and maximize retention.


It has been proven that delivering training in smaller portions, rather than all at once leads to better overall retention and stronger permanent learning effects. We recommend training on a monthly basis to keep safety at the forefront throughout the year.


The program is flexible enough to customize training to fit an organizations needs, whether that be monthly, bi-monthly, or weekly, we can meet your particular training needs.